Monday, January 17, 2022

Orlando Weeks on Hop Up: “I wanted to feel nine clouds in each song”

Must Read

Isiah Sverve Scott is mocking his return to a former hero he is familiar with

Isiah “Sverve” Scott, better known as Shane Strickland, was released by WWE last fall. Sure, it’s old...

Police identify hostage-taker in Texas synagogue standoff

The suspect who held the rabbi and his community hostage at a synagogue in Texas was identified Sunday...

Andrew Robb will be the new head of the Foundation

Former head of Farfetch online luxury...


As before Maccabilar the frontman releases his second solo album “Hop Up”, Orlando Weeks talked to about creating a happy new record.

The album is after 2020 “Acceleration”, and aimed to fill the gaps before him. Both records detail Weeks ’experience as a father, documenting the anticipation, anticipation, and insecurity he felt before his son arrived with“ Speed ​​”. Hop Up, on the other hand, enjoys happiness, relief, and an all-encompassing love after the baby is born.

“I didn’t want to [‘A Quickening’] being the only album of this experience, ”Weeks said From his home in London. “It just wasn’t complete.” Therefore, no tour is conducted COVID-19 after closing, the musician began work on filling in the rest of his music album, which was helped by a new “manifesto”. “I wanted every cloud to have nine such feelings in each song – a job I left to myself and Nathan. [Jenkins, aka Bullion, the album’s producer]”It was a relief or a swim. It was less documentary and more atmospheric,” he continued. [this time]”.

Writing in a more optimistic and cheerful frame surprised the singer-songwriter, as his many years focused on the other side of the emotional spectrum of life with songwriting. “In the early days of songwriting, I didn’t feel attached to anything, but as soon as the Maccabees signed up, my desire to be a songwriter or a professional musician was the only way to justify it – to focus on hard and difficult things, “It somehow legitimized it. I don’t know what drunken conversation made me think it made sense, but I’ve been clinging to it for years.”

“There are songs that I put aside that had something really interesting and beautiful in them, but because they didn’t feel like I was tying them up to some kind of disaster, I said,‘ No, I can’t. I will be, ”I said. Don’t do that, it’s not for me. “

In the past, Weeks has also made excuses that one should not doubt the joys of life to avoid writing happy songs. “It’s just lazy,” he said. Allowing himself to do so now and delve deeper into the joyful experiences, he added that he knew they were as complex as dark feelings. “And you don’t spoil the joy by thinking about the joy – you just lift it into the air. It gave me an appreciation and love for music, I think I always knew it was great, but I felt out of my jurisdiction. ”

Parenting changed Weeks ’work style because other responsibilities, which he described as both“ very serious ”and“ funny, ”took up a large portion of his time. “You have less time, you’re more tired, so how can you work smarter rather than longer,” he explained. At this stage of his career, and given the impact of the pandemic on the music industry, he began to see his work as less of a pleasure and more of a ‘cure’.

Since appearing in the band Maccabi in 2004, the musician has released seven albums – four with the band Brighton, the original part of this book. Gritterman, and now, two solo records. According to him, “Hop Up” was the most exciting experience he had in creating an album.

“It was fast, but often not,” he thought. “I didn’t feel left out at any point, in the lyrics or in the song,” he said. Also, I didn’t do it in my apartment where little people and partners wanted to sleep in another room. I went to a friend’s vacancy, drank beer, shouted, and trumpeted loudly.

Working with Bullion also added to the experience and gave Weeks a new partner to help manage his nightly experiences. “We’ve got a musical language that means what it means when someone wants to say something, but they don’t have the right musical term – usually me – very quickly,” he said. “For this record, I suddenly felt that the music Nathan gave me was my new favorite record or my new favorite song.”

Orlando Weeks CREDIT: Press

There were weeks between tracks that the producer provided or re-entered Jon Kale“Never Give Up,” Prefab Sprout’s “When Breaks Love Down,” and Wings“A bullet going through myself.” “It’s an incredible song,” he said of the latter, “and I felt like I wanted to feel the record.”

Among the other artists who appeared on the record is Heavenly Recordings ’signature Katy J Pearson, Willie J Healey and Frank Ocean partner Ben Reed. Working with other musicians allowed Weeks to hear what they were working on with new ears. “It’s much easier to draw a curtain on my insecurities if someone else is doing it with you,” he explained.

Pearson is a musician who has been in contact for many years and wrote when he and his brother were in the band Ardyn. “It was great to watch him rebuild everything from the ashes of this project,” he said. “I think it’s a testament to his ability as a musician, but also his passionate personality.”

With a number of instore concerts on the horizon and The full UK tour comes in March, Weeks is now facing a new challenge, such as merging the worlds of A Quickening and Hop Up into one show. While the locks shorten his live plans for his first album, these concerts represent his first opportunity to perform both recordings to audiences familiar with the music.

“Part of the task is to complete the set and how to mix the two worlds,” he said. “It simply came to our notice then. But “Speed” was very introspective, very unique, and still a record. When I played shows before the record came out [in 2020], they were great spectators – very quiet, very respectful. Although he has “Hop Up” in his arsenal, he hopes the mood of his shows will now change.

“I don’t want there to be a single atmosphere in these shows. So my responsibility to the people who bought the songs and the tickets is that I want them to go even further. It’s not easy to get people through a few steps with you, but it’s a job. “

Depending on how the pandemic continues to impact touring and live music, the third album may be faster with us. Weeks is already working on new material, the goal of which is to “guess” what he’s interested in in “Hop Up”. “I couldn’t tell you briefly what it was right now, but there’s something I want to spend more time on,” he said. “I want to develop on this without being tied to any topics, and just let me push and pull a little bit.”

The musician hopes to reach a milestone in the long run if his output is two-room. “My favorite Bowie record “Low”, this is his 11th record, I think “Pet Sounds” Beach guys11-record. So 11 looks like a magic number. I have to be 11. “

Is this an album that will be an Orlando Weeks classic? “Yeah, just four stinkers, then one opus,” he laughed.

Orlando Weeks ’“ Hop Up ”is now out through PIAS. Weeks will travel across the UK in March – you can find dates and tickets on its official website.



- Advertisement -
Latest News

Isiah Sverve Scott is mocking his return to a former hero he is familiar with

Isiah “Sverve” Scott, better known as Shane Strickland, was released by WWE last fall. Sure, it’s old...

Police identify hostage-taker in Texas synagogue standoff

The suspect who held the rabbi and his community hostage at a synagogue in Texas was identified Sunday as a British citizen as...

Andrew Robb will be the new head of the Foundation

Former head of Farfetch online luxury fashion platform claims to be...

Bez wears a melon helmet and dances on Happy Mondays at the Dancing on Ice

without appeared Dancing on ice early today (January 16), skate to one Happy Monday'The biggest hits when wearing a melon helmet. The new series...

AEW stars will respond after WWE pulls out their horrific programs

Recently, WWE opened fire on AEW content, calling it horrific and violent. Vince McMahon even went so far as to ask if...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This