Thursday, May 19, 2022

NYers dope pets, use stunt doubles to get dogs past co-op boards

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In the first 30 minutes of the Cooperative Council interview, the Frenchman – a mix between a Boston Terrier and a French Bulldog – was a little angel.

But minutes later, as the dog’s medication began to run out, the owner became nervous.

“He gets excited when he meets new people, so we gave him Benadril as a gift,” said the 51-year-old marketing director. “The vet said he would help us. He was instructed to help with the itchy skin, but he said he would give it to the interviewer in the coming days to calm the dog down.

When the woman and her husband refused to rent a Village for the Upper East Side Cooperative, they became concerned about the severity of their financial situation. Their accounts were good, the council said – but there had to be a conversation with a family member’s dog.

“They said it clearly,” the marketing manager said. “If the dog was in trouble, we wouldn’t have gotten the apartment.”

Trainer Bash Dibra (seen here with Delila) offers special courses to encourage dogs to behave in collaborative board interviews.

Because pandemic cases at home have led to fears of divorce and other misbehavior in dogs, more New Yorkers are afraid to interview a needy or naughty pet cooperative council – so they drink their heels, call stuntmen, and shooting. for special classes.

“When a prospective buyer calls me, their dog is one of the first things I ask,” said Wendy Sarason, a luxury agent for Brown Harris Stevens. “It can be as important as how many millions [of dollars] liquidity in them. “

Sarason also saw clients injecting a sedative into his dog. They were pets who exchanged empty homes for the Park Avenue Cooperative, and their pets were accustomed to running and barking as they wished. “It was a big dog and they weren’t sure he was going to behave,” he recalls.

Another prospective tenant wanted to buy a pet in a building that weighed 25 pounds or less – but his dog weighed almost 50 pounds. “So he put him on a strict weight loss program,” Sarason said, hoping that if the dog didn’t look at least a little rotten, he could pass the board’s critical eye. did. Luckily, “they didn’t argue with him.”

Even for thin, city-friendly dogs, the broker advised owners to work with Bash Dibra. Dog behavior in New York City has long been a staple of television, but it has carefully created a lucrative pandemic scene: preparing Fido for a $ 500 cooperative board for each session.

Real estate agent Wendy Sarasohn said the potential buyer's dog
Real estate agent Wendy Sarason said the potential buyer’s dog was “as important as millions” in the approval process. [of dollars] liquidity in them. “

Dibra told The Post that she was hired several times a month and that their numbers are increasing due to spring purchases.

He usually works with the owners for a few weeks, prepares the dogs to walk on the leash without pulling, comes quietly when called, and of course never jumps on people. “The end result? We will get a great dog who will go through the board and be a great member of the family, ”Dibra said.

Shark Tank star and Corcoran Group founder Barbara Corcoran
Shark Tank star and Corcoran Group founder Barbara Corcoran points out that potential buyers sometimes switch to another dog for an interview.

The coach added that he understands why boards take control of heels so tightly: “They need to think about insurance. If you have a biting dog, this will be a problem for the building as tariffs skyrocket.

However, some buyers simply surrender and call.

Energy broker Barbara Corcoran recalled one case in which an apartment buyer was worried that their bad-tempered toy dog ​​would break the contract.

“So he borrowed Shih Tzu, who looked like a dog, for a board meeting and passed away,” the Shark Tank star said. “When he moved into the house, the board thought the dog’s behavior had changed. I’m sure it will happen a lot. ”

In fact, Sarason has similar stories – a willing buyer is worried that his puppy may not “stop barking or urinate on the carpet”. He was very thoughtful about who to treat. ”

So the woman borrowed a friend’s dog from a local dog and left her pet at home. A well-behaved stand went through the board conversation.

Meanwhile, Philip Salem Compass real estate has another solution: Hollywood high gloss. She advises clients to collect a heart-warming montage of cute dog images set to catchy music and share them with the board even before they are called for an interview.

“This is a dog’s resume. You can do everything on your iPhone in less than a minute, ”he said. “Pictures with children, [a dog] Dressed in a suit and asleep, he pulls the heart strings of the board.

Broker Philip Salem invites clients to create films that show how cute their pets are in order to win their cooperative boards.
Broker Philip Salem invites clients to create films that show how cute their pets are in order to win their cooperative boards.

Salem also often sends videos to sales agents, convincing them that the potential buyer’s dog is obedient and receiving attestation letters from grooms and dog walkers.

So he recently helped a family find the best co-op in Fort Green. Their nine-year-old rescuer worked as a therapy dog ​​for stressful students, so his wife combined photos of him with his children and a Halloween costume.

The wife of the head of the pharmaceutical department said: “We received a letter from the door guard at our current location, his voice was not loud.” “We had to bring the same number of references for the dog, if not more than ours.”

Still, he doesn’t want to take any risks: on the day of the board interview, he took his pet for a longer walk, then sent him anti-anxiety medication.

As for the Frenchman in Benadryl, the interview lasted 90 minutes and the dog fell asleep most of it. The owner felt a little guilty: “We went through so many rings that it was impossible to get this apartment.”

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