Friday, January 28, 2022

Meet an old physicist who traveled the world – for cheese | CBC News

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What do the former physicist and cheese maker have in common?

Not many, if they are not the same person.

When Aditya Raghavan’s interest in physics began to wane, she switched her scientific life to producing artisanal cheese as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alberta.

He first started making cheese in 2011, and in 2012 completely switched to it.

“I used to work at university and make salad or bread, cheese and the like at home,” Raghavan, now 40, told Edmonton. The radio is active.

Of all the baking experiences he had at home, the only thing that caught his attention was the cheese.

In 2020, he revived his passion for cheese made with organic milk under the Fleur Jaune Cheese brand for Meuwly’s Artisan Food Market, a Edmonton company that specializes in locally produced gourmet foods.

While Raghavan doesn’t have a full cheese-making kitchen at Meuwly’s, he cooks seven or eight different cheeses a week at 320 pounds.

“He shouldn’t be sitting in the fridge for weeks and weeks,” she said. “You know, it should be consumed in 10-12 days.”

On the other hand, his old cheese wheels are about three months old.

Raghavan, a scientist at heart, wanted to study the true art of caseiculture (cheese making).

He has been involved in France and Italy, where he “spent a lot of time” in 2016 and 2017 to improve his skills.

“Because as far as we know, most of the cheese we have today comes from Europe,” he said.

He set up bases in the Savoy region of France and in the Italian Alps, where he learned “a skill he can’t get from a book” from cheese masters.

In 2017, he was a delegate to a cheese conference in northern Italy.

“Quebec also has a great history of cheese, but the traditional skills of making cheese are still a European skill set,” Raghavan said. “It was very important to go home and learn that.”

His European travels inspired him to fill a gap in the Canadian market by creating new cheeses using pasteurized organic milk.

“I feel that this flavor or texture and profile of the cheese is something you can’t find in packaged products,” he said.

Raghavan calls India his home and in 2013 he found a job as a cheese consultant to dairy farmers while on vacation there.

Listen here |

5:40There was one local cheese maker all over the world

We talk to Aditya Raghavan about her cheese journeys and the flavors they inspire. 5:40

However, he added that despite their love of dairy products, Indians traditionally do not consume much cottage cheese.

Armed with the knowledge he gained while traveling across North America and Europe, Ragavan wanted to share all he knew with dairy farmers. It reflected European cheese practice in India.

Traditional techniques

Raghavan’s travels changed his way of working with cheese and turned him into a traditional technique.

“We don’t have artificial ingredients and [the cheeses] there are no stabilizers and other chemicals that will keep it for a long time, ”he said.

The cheese should be a fresh natural product, for example, hallumi, fromage blanc or his personal favorite stracciatella – a stringy, elongated mozzarella cheese mixed with sour cream.

“It sounds weird, but it’s delicious,” Raghavan said. She prepares stracciatella every week.

As an Indian chef, Raghavan is no stranger to herbs and spices, and as long as he likes to use them in his products, he is cautious.

“I make peasant cheese in this French way and sometimes I make it from saffron tincture,” he said. “It modulates the cheese cream.”

But more often than not, he adds herbs and spices to the outside of the cheeses, where they work to improve the appearance and flavor.

“So if you cut it, you can eat as much or as little as you want,” Raghavan said.

This allows the customer to control the taste of the cheese at will, instead of being controlled by the manufacturer.

“Cheese becomes an experience. It’s a pleasure.”

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