Monday, January 17, 2022

From ‘Last Picture Show’ to ‘Mask’

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For film lovers, Pyotr Bogdanovich has always been a pleasant sight with his ubiquitous spectacles and ever-present ascotics. And his films were as modern and timeless as the director’s sense of fashion.

Bogdanovich, who died Thursday morning at the age of 82, was a film fan like any hard film starter, starting as a film critic and working as a film programmer at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the 1960s. But along with such luminaries as Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, Bogdanovich also made his way into his sixty-year career and starred in an unusual three-part series in the 1970s. z included.

For those who want to honor the real Hollywood original, Bogdanovich’s six important films are worth watching:

Pyotr Bogdanovich:The director of “Paper Moon” and “The Last Photo Show” has died at the age of 82

“Goals” (1968)

Bogdanovich made a good debut with a crime thriller produced by B-movie legend Roger Korman and starring the terrifying character Boris Karloff in one of his last roles. This is a still-relevant film about a movie actor (Carloff) who is disappointed with real violence and decides to give up his profession before his life is tragically approached by a Vietnamese veteran (Tim O’Kelli). . mass shooting.

Where to watch: Apple TV, Amazon, Google Play

Cybill Shepherd made her Hollywood debut in Peter Bogdanovich's adult drama

“The Last Picture Exhibition” (1971)

Filmed in black and white, Bogdanovich’s sharp work about high school students growing up in a poor Texas town in the 1950s earned him two Oscar nominations for writing and directing. Cybill Shepherd made her Hollywood debut as one of the central youngsters in the film – along with Jeff Bridges in one of her first roles – Ben Johnson and Kloris Lichman each won Academy Award for Supporting Actor.

Where to watch: Apple TV, Voodoo, Amazon

“What’s the matter, doctor?” (1972)

Not only was it a tribute to old school comedies, but Bogdanovich named the film in honor of Bugs Bunny’s charming phrase in the cartoon. In addition to introducing the world to Madeline Kahn, the film combines Ryan O’Neill’s silly musicologist and Barbra Streisand’s eccentric sprite of a carrot grinder for a variety of cheerful tall jeans across San Francisco, as well as a charming love story.

Where to watch: Apple TV, Voodoo, Amazon

Ryan O'Neill and his daughter Tatum played the role of Middle West fraudsters in the 1973 comedy.

“Paper Moon” (1973)

O’Neill and Bodanovic reunited for this Depression-era comedy, and child star Tatum O’Neill became the youngest competitive Oscar winner at the age of 10. A father and daughter play the role of a few travelers who have been caught cheating and defrauding the Bible. threatens to drive a dagger between other grifts and eccentric carni (Kahn) hucksters in different rubes until the law is broken.

Where to watch:Apple TV, Voodoo, Amazon Prime

“Mask” (1985)

Based on the real-life story of Rocky Dennis, Bogdonavich’s inspiring biopic depicts Eric Stolts as a teenager with a rare disease that broke his skull while trying to live a normal life. She and Cher (who played the role of the mother of a young silly cyclist) both won a Golden Globe nomination, the film won an Oscar for Best Makeup, and the director’s overly maud-free eye-popping and hopeful story created.

Where to watch: DVD

Edward Herrmann (left) plays William Randolph Hearst, Kirsten Dunst plays Marion Davis, Eddie Izzard plays Charlie Chaplin and Joanna Lumy plays Elinor Glin.

“Cat’s Brain” (2001)

Before David Fincher revisited the golden age of Hollywood with the fictional “Mank,” one of Bogdanovich’s highlights in later years was this historical drama based on the mysterious death of film mogul Thomas Ince. The devastating cruise of the 1920s is a scene for this dark comedy discovery, in which celebrities of a certain era, led by Kirsten Dunst as Marion Davis and Eddie Izzard as Charlie Chaplin, can be captured only by movie whims.

Where to watch: Wood, Amazon, Tubi

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